On the usefulness of measuring things

There’s something about management thinkers and measuring things. They just can’t get enough of it. They have a congenital need to count stuff. In fact, they just don’t seem to be able to get through the day without quantifying something. But there’s a reason for that. It’s because they’re right. Continue reading

Developing an academic workload model

I wrote recently about the benefits – and challenges – of developing academic workload models within higher education institutions. Somebody asked me subsequently what a workload model could look like in practice, so I drew them the diagram below. I’ll be the first to admit that it’s not pretty, but it does hopefully give an indication of how such a model could be developed and what information it could provide.

Workload Model

Just click on the image to get a PDF version. And if you’d like to know more or to discuss how workload modelling could help your institution, please do feel free to get in touch.

Measurement is good, but measurement plus action is better

Finding ways to measure your organisation’s performance is important. It gives you valuable information on what is happening, what is working and what is not. But measurement is only the first step. It is what you do with the information that can make all the difference. Continue reading

Designing effective performance measures

I have spent the last couple of weeks immersed in all sorts of performance measures. Some have been good, some have been less good and others have been inspired. So while the thoughts are still fresh in my mind, here are some tips on how to develop performance measures for your organisation that will really make a difference. Continue reading

Building resilient public services

At the annual conference of the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) last week, Amyas Morse, the head of the National Audit Office, called on the government to explain how it will respond to failing public services in the new environment of increased competition and spending restraint. Continue reading