About Simon Perks

Writer, trail runner, hill walker, astronomer, kayaker, paddleboarder, photographer, nerd, tea drinker, lover of the sea, labrador wrangler

Understanding the problem

A lot of my work involves helping my clients to solve problems. Perhaps funding has been cut, or performance is down or something has happen that has thrown things into turmoil. Either way, there’s a problem. And something needs to be done about it. But there’s a gap in the middle there that often gets missed. You need to know what the problem is that you are trying to solve. Continue reading

Rethinking what’s important

Earlier this month, the leaders of some of the United States’s biggest corporations changed their definition of what a company is all about. This revelation may not seem of interest to anyone other than accountants. But if these individuals deliver actions to match their words, it could potentially be huge. And we’ll all feel the impact.

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Intent. Implementation. Impact

One of the great things about being a school governor* (and there are a lot of great things) is that I get to learn about things that wouldn’t otherwise come onto my radar. One of these is the new Ofsted education inspection framework. This is important not just because it determines how the inspectors will assess ‘my’ school. But also because it has introduced me to the concept of intent, implementation and impact.

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Paying tax is important. And fun.

While tax isn’t everyone’s first choice of topic for dinner party discussions, it really should be. Because tax is important. And paying tax is important. It is how we fund the things that our society needs. Like healthcare, roads, defence and environmental protection. And so, with this week being Fair Tax Week, I thought I’d take a few moments to talk about Sockmonkey’s own approach to paying tax fairly.
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From data to action

I’ve been working with one of my clients recently to help them to put together a strategy and action plan for an area in which they’d like to see some improvement. They knew what they wanted to do, but they were struggling to get the necessary senior people on board. Not because they didn’t have great ideas. And not because they didn’t have the data to back up their ideas. But because they weren’t using the data in a convincing way. Continue reading